New resources to help dementia care

Photo / Supplied.

Revolutionary modules are winning accolades from the healthcare industry.

A new set of free educational resources, designed to improve care for people with dementia in Aotearoa, New Zealand, has been welcomed with open arms by carers since its launch in early September.

Created by the New Zealand Dementia Foundation (NZDF) with a substantial grant from the CHT Aged Care Fund, the Dementia STARs (Short Trainings in Awareness and Responsiveness) teaching resource kits have already been downloaded hundreds of times.

Dr Susan Gee, NZDF Sector Liaison and host of the Dementia STARs webinar, says the feedback received so far from the healthcare sector has been overwhelmingly positive.

“We’ve been delighted with how Dementia STARs has been embraced by caregivers, with an incredible response complimenting the accessible, informative and relevant nature of the content,” she says.

“It is estimated that at least 50% of people living in aged care facilities have some form of dementia, so ensuring access to this type of information is essential for long-term well-being. term of our elderly.”

Carriann Hall, Chief Executive, CHT Healthcare Trust.  Photo / Supplied.
Carriann Hall, Chief Executive, CHT Healthcare Trust. Photo / Supplied.

Designed to benefit dementia caregivers, including doctors, nurses, support workers and educators, the eight Dementia STARs modules are based on expert dementia research and are based on sound educational principles tailored to the needs of those caring for people with dementia in all areas. types of parameters.

Each of the modules presents a person-centred approach to a key element of care when supporting people with dementia, covering bathing, the senses, pain management, falls, delirium, proper nutrition, hydration and continence.

The resources offer flexibility in delivery with a Facilitator’s Kit – which contains everything needed to host an engaging face-to-face training session – as well as a pre-recorded webinar designed to be practical and relevant for caregivers of all backgrounds, especially our kaiāwhina workforce like caregivers. A mix of practical examples and ideas, as well as links to research encourage the exchange of experiences and creative responses.

Face-to-face training in a group setting is considered the most effective and engaging way to deliver training sessions. A mix of practical examples and ideas, as well as links to research, have been developed to encourage the exchange of experiences, and creative responses.

Dr Matthew Croucher, Chairman, NZ Dementia Foundation (left) and Dr Susan Gee, Sector Liaison Office (right).  Photo / Supplied.
Dr Matthew Croucher, Chairman, NZ Dementia Foundation (left) and Dr Susan Gee, Sector Liaison Office (right). Photo / Supplied.

A charitable trust in the residential aged care sector, focused on purpose rather than profit, CHT Healthcare Trust established the Aged Care Fund in 2019 to fund initiatives that improve care for the elderly of New Zealand, including research on their needs, access to care and Workforce development.

Carriann Hall, chief executive of the trust, said the successful launch of the Dementia STARs project signaled a promising new era in dementia care.

“Enabling all providers and their caregivers, including those cared for at home, to have access to expert knowledge about dementia will go a long way to contributing to the well-being of our older adults,” she said.

“Our own unit managers are already echoing the positive sentiments around the innovative and user-friendly nature of the modules and anticipate that they will be a great addition to our training suite.”

Applications are now open for the 2022 CHT Aged Care Fund grant – apply online at http://www.cht.co.nz/agedcarefund by October 31, 2022.

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